The National Museum of Health and Medicine in Silver Spring, Maryland hosted a program titled Anatomy of Sports. I was one of the invited medical illustrators who painted muscles on athletes to show which muscles were used when playing different types of sports.

The athlete, the physical therapist, and the medical illustrator worked as a team to demonstrate and explain to the visitors while we painted muscles on the athletes.  The athlete would demonstrate the movements, and the physical therapist would explain how common injuries occurred.

The sport I was assigned to was swimming. So, I made a quick sketch of the muscles used for swimming beforehand as a reference.Anatomy of swimming muscles sports

The main muscles used for swimming are: trapezius, pectoralis major, deltoids, biceps, triceps, infraspinatus, and lattisimus dorsi. I had tried out the makeup/pastel the day before, so I knew what to expect using a somewhat foreign medium.anatomy of sports swimming muscles

I got to work with Kathy, a swimming instructor in the DC area. She was very patient with me and the visitors while I painted muscles on her skin. I felt like I had to paint quickly, but soon found out that the process was going very easily because Kathy already had prominent muscles. I could actually trace a lot of her muscles!
First I applied the base color. Then some broad shadows. Then more detailed shadows. After I was happy with the overall shape, I created highlights with the white makeup/pastel. Again, I would go from broad to detailed. Then I used a black watercolor pencil to differentiate the muscles and show some bony attachments. anatomy of sports swimming muscles

The physical therapist was really knowledgeable and talked a lot about common swimming injuries. Even though swimming is considered a low-risk sport, there are ways to injure your shoulders. She also explained how to build muscle evenly to reduce strain on the trapezius.anatomy of sports swimming muscles

After I was done painting, Kathy demonstrated some swimming motions. It was very neat to see that the painting over her skin was moving in conjunction to her arm motions! The visitors were asking about all kinds of personal injury stories.anatomy of sports swimming muscles

It was so much fun seeing my friends and colleagues too!

Judy painted the cyclist (she’s a cyclist herself)anatomy of sports bicycling muscles

Devon painted the football player (Did you know that there are professional female football leagues? Neat!)anatomy of sports football muscles

Betsy painted the basketball player (Look at all the tendons!)anatomy of sports basketball muscles

Bricelyn painted the soccer player (I love how she added blue to the tendons to show how shiny they are)anatomy of sports soccer muscles

Liz painted the horse and the equestrian! (She helped organize this event.  Thank you for this wonderful opportunity)anatomy of sports horse skeleton

Last but not least, a very talented PT painted the volleyball player (wow! she’s good!!)anatomy of sports volleyball muscles
What a fun day! It was very popular with the visitors despite the heat!  I’m already looking forward to doing it again next year!anatomy of sports muscles bones

About Ikumi Kayama

Studio Kayama’s Founder, Ikumi Kayama is an award-winning medical & scientific illustrator who helps scientists and doctors how to be heard and understood and how to express the value of what they do through accurate and useful illustrations. Ikumi's mission is to make science relevant and accessible to everyone using accurate visuals. She also gives PowerPoint Design Tip seminars for the scientists and various illustration technique courses for the artists. Come say hello and follow Ikumi on facebook, twitter, LinkedIn, Youtube, and Google+ .